Layers Of Intention

Layers Of Intention

Inspired by the past, Miri Davidovitz creates an ideal version of the future. 

Against an external wall of a falafel fast-food restaurant in Yaffo, Miri Davidovitz set the stage for her photo shoot. The series features a selection of male and female models, visibly from various parts of the world. Photographer, Miri Davidovitz was inspired by the immigrants of both past and present. “Today, people move from country to country and to different continents for many reasons. Traditions are mixed as a result of this.” Davidovitz specifies that the Eastern European style of layering, which was once considered outdated and a signifier of low socioeconomic status, simply as a utilitarian means to keep warm, is now very much in vogue. The shoot explores the concept of mixing, of using both high and lowbrow to achieve a desired look. The style has been adapted by high-end fashion houses such as Gucci, Burberry and Balenciaga. “I created what I wish society would look like, a harmonious fusion where all people are accepted,” Davidovitz shares.

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Free Fall

Tal R’s Natten, captures the moment we fear but need the most.

Haifa’s Ghost Town

Unifying the city’s artists, musicians, producers and nightlife impresarios is Ghostown, a collective formed in 2011 by a cast of Haifa locals.

How To Practice Invisibility

How To Practice Invisibility

From Plato’s shepherd to J.R.R. Tolkien’s Frodo Baggins to J.K. Rowlings’ Harry Potter, fictional characters granted the superpower of invisibility are almost exclusively male.
Female narratives of invisibility, it seems, can only ever be metaphorical and tragic. Many women experience aging as a compulsory disappearance act. There’s even an old hollywood film genre dedicated to it. Think of Gloria Swanson in Sunset Boulevard or Bette Davis in The Star. Cautionary tales of fading film stars who at 40 shut themselves away in remote villas, unable to bear parting with their fans’ admiring gaze. 
 
“See what happens when all you care about is beauty?” These stories cruelly warn us. And we want to listen to them. To change our perceptions and transform our admirations. The young women we look up to today are much more than golden-ratio faces. They’re the smartest. The funniest. The bravest. The truest. We feel compelled to know their every idiosyncrasy: their wondrously odd taste in clothes; their singular artistic talents; their political opinions and actions; their skin regimes and blemishes; their honest poems; messy meals and bedroom decor. We care about their preferences and their flaws, their relationships and mental health issues. We want to take in so much more of them than beauty. But…wait a minute. Could it be that our captivation by these highly visible, shareable qualities is yet another form of looking? Could they even exist outside the realm of sight? In other words, can we love what we can’t see?
The important question isn’t so much about our habits of fandom but how these affect the young girls whom we watch so closely. People’s gazes are powerful. They posses a magnetic-like pull. What others notice about you might become the most important thing. The only thing, even. The parts of you that have eyes pointed at them — it’s like you feel their existence more strongly. I know I did, as a teenager. I still do sometimes. 
 
There’s no doubt that fighting for visibility is crucial for groups of people who are being socially  and culturally ignored. But isn’t simultaneously invoking invisibility’s mythical power just as important? Isn’t fighting for invisibility’s refuge just as crucial?
 

How? I’m not sure. But, I bet we’ll know it when we (don’t) see it. It isn’t necessarily about hiding, deleting your social media accounts or trying to ignore what you wear. It might have to do with cultivating mysterious practices that cannot be documented or noticed. Only felt. With allowing yourself to become immersed in whatever’s in front of you, disappear into it. With loving secretly in wifi-less spaces. With eating soft food while forgetting the world exists. It isn’t “dancing like nobody’s watching.” But, just dancing. Alone. In a room with no mirrors. Or filled with them, doesn’t matter. It’s about taking just as much pride in what you don’t share, can’t explain, and won’t remember. Getting excited about the tiniest secrets. Paying the closest attention to all of those precious parts of yourself that nobody will ever be able to see, touch, influence, harm, caress, or take away.

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Rare Poise

A modern label is draped in the elegance of yesteryear.

Hidden Revelation

Donning robe like fashions of undulating folds and layers, the photos are a study in thoughtful concealment.

Passion Fruit

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Sand Castles

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Threads For Change

Threads For Change

Adish is the long-awaited answer for today’s cool crowd drawn to initiatives embodying inclusivity and an effortless spirit.

Adish, a high-end streetwear label, photographed their debut collection in Jisr az-Zarqa, the last remaining Arab village on the Mediterranean coast of Israel. Jisr az-Zarqa is one of the most impoverished places in the country and is home to both a crime-ridden village and a sleepy beach, unblemished by time. Collection 001 was shot amidst the authentic fisherman’s beach, replete with wooden boats, their color nearly stripped away, rocking back and forth with the tide at the sea’s shoreline. 

Childhood friends, Amit Luzon and Eyal Eliyahu had always dreamed of founding a creative endeavor together. The pair, both 25 years old, met in Ramat HaSharon, where they attended the same high school. Following their army service, the duo traveled through North and South America and began ideating about their future. Inspired by the fashion they encountered during their travels, they initially thought to open a store in Israel with one-off pieces imported from abroad. Upon further consideration Luzon and Eliyahu decided to explore and utilize their own surroundings, rather than outsource for inspiration. With a shared love for Middle Eastern craftsmanship stemming from their respective familial origins, Libya and Iraq, regional insignia was always that to which each was drawn. 

“At the end of 2016, we realized there weren’t any authentic Middle Eastern brands with an international reach representing the region and its culture. That’s when we decided to start Adish. We began to think about what sort of elements we could utilize in the brand, whether it should be a t-shirt collection or perhaps something larger,” explained co-founders Luzon and Eliyahu. “We wanted to do something different and not just print a slogan on a t-shirt. We had heard about Palestinian embroidery before but didn’t know exactly how to connect with local artisans.” The brand’s name, Adish, which means apathetic in Hebrew, was chosen purposely and sarcastically, and meant to provoke thought and perhaps ignite a sense of responsibility to fuel meaningful reform in the region. 

 Adish began to take shape once Luzon and Eliyahu were introduced to the Parents Circle-Families Forum (PCFF), an Israeli-Palestinian organization comprised of over 600 families, each having lost an immediate family member to the ongoing conflict. The PCFF promotes dialogue and tolerance between Israelis and Palestinians and connects two groups who under ordinary circumstances, would likely never cross paths. Luzon and Eliyahu learned of a PCFF initiative that supports Palestinian women who work with embroidery and set up a time to meet in person. 

 

The two traveled to Beit Jala, a Palestinian Christian village in the Bethlehem district to meet with three women in their late 50’s, who at the time were only accustomed to embroidering pillows and decorative commercial items. “We sat with them and listened to their stories of how they lost their husbands and sons to the conflict. We wanted these women to be a part of Adish and to give their craft an audience. We left them some t-shirts and hoped they could work with fabrics that aren’t typically embroidered,” Eliyahu recalled. 

 

“After the first few products were completed, we were all thrilled with the results. Now we have more than 50 women collaborating with us, some from PCFF but many from outside the organization,” shared Luzon. The pair explained how originally they thought the traditional embroidery would be just one element of the brand, but upon seeing the results, the embroidery took on a life of its own and became rooted in the blossoming identity of Adish. As part of the partnership with the Palestinian women, all Adish apparel includes information on the care labels identifying the Palestinian traditional embroidery and craftsmanship.

 

The women who work with Adish are divided into two groups. The first focuses on the production of a collection and the second strategizes the next phase of development for the upcoming season’s collection. The two-year old brand has produced two collections, 001 and Area A. The upcoming Fall/Winter 2019 line will include elements of a new partnership between Adish and a factory in Lakiya, a Bedouin town in the south of Israel, specializing in traditional weaving techniques. The brand prides itself in celebrating and showcasing indigenous craftsmanship and the skilled individuals who immerse themselves in traditional insignia. 

Adish collections are carried at Opening Ceremony in New York City, Los Angeles and Tokyo, Voo Store in Berlin, Slam Jam in Milan and in fine retail spaces throughout Europe, Asia and the US.

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Flush of Youth

Photographer, Michal Chelbin captures a rural population at the cusp of adulthood.

Growing Sideways

What happens if we choose community over continuity, squiggly lines over lineage? What if our friends can teach us more than our public figures? Why not be inspired by what surrounds is instead of what’s “above” us?

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Reading Women

Reading Women

Since the emergence of Feminist critical theory, no cultural text about women is read without raising the question of its feminism or lack thereof; and no “feminine” text has been as widely discussed regarding that question, as Little Women.
Louise May Alcott’s 1886 coming-of-age novel has been translated into over 50 languages, (with ten versions in Hebrew); adapted to countless stage and opera performances; multiple television series (including a Japanese manga take); and most famously, nearly ten films. Elisabeth Taylor played blonde, beautiful Amy in 1949; Winona Ryder embodied an intense Jo in 1994; most recently, Saoirse Ronan (as Jo), Emma Watson (as Meg) and Timothée Chalamet (as Laurie) star in the 2019 adaptation directed by the intriguing Greta Gerwig. But how are the Victorian ideals of womanhood conveyed in this Civil war era story, filled with eventually-dutiful ladies in gloves and silk stockings, relevant to our age of stronger-than-ever Feminism?    The answer isn’t quite so simple, with the book’s conflicting forces apparent as early as the title. On the one hand, the novel is for and about Women published in a decade when such a thing was quite rare. And not just women, young women, a population and audience no one was considering back then, let alone taking seriously. It’s also a book written by a woman, an intellectual who remained unmarried and provided for her entire family with the earnings from the novel’s success. These factors alone can explain the book’s Feminist aura, still enthralling readers today.

On the other hand, there’s also that discomforting qualifier: Little. Many critics have emphasized the novel’s smallness and sweetness, some to the extent of describing the plot as the story of four women “becoming-little”. During the course of their story, the March sisters dispose of their anger, their dissatisfaction and restlessness; they learn how to obliterate hopes of taking up more space, of living larger lives, of growing into the artists they once aspired to be. Jo marries the elder Professor Bhaer, not the young, passionate Laurie. With him she runs a school for boys instead of becoming a famous writer who uses “a magic inkstand” and lives in a castle “piled high with books”; Beth, the kind, fragile, pianist, dies at 18; Meg, the eldest, gives up on acting, and the materialistic Amy relinquishes her true love of painting. It is as if the girls learn to embrace, not protest, what it means to be women in Christian America, to “conquer themselves beautifully”, as their absent father Mr. March put it in his letter to them.

Yet neither of these perspectives encompass Little Women‘s internal tensions and complexities. According to literary scholar and feminist theorist, Dr. Orly Lubin, the novel’s opposing characteristics are exactly what create its ongoing allure, as they enable an option of “reading our way into” a very singular sort of feminism. A feminism far removed from the current Hollywood ideal emphasizing self-fulfillment and other overly-emphatic neoliberal themes for women. These, says Dr. Lubin, are about as realistic for most of us as the infamous happily- ever-after endings.  In a way, the book’s importance has more to do with us, its readers, making our own sense of the narrative’s conflicting notions, than about the characters’ choices either rebelling against patriarchal structures or succumbing to them. Perhaps, suggests Dr. Lubin, we may read Beth’s premature death as the demise of that suffocating Victorian symbol– the angelic selfless woman. Or Jo’s renunciation of literary fame and romantic love as a compromise between a liveable life and a sense of agency, achieved through the choice of career and community. Maybe Amy doesn’t leave art behind but re-invents it in a more representative form– through becoming her own work of beauty. And though Meg gives up acting to live a small, tough, family life, she also manages the nearly impossible balance between sexuality and motherhood.

What Dr. Lubin is suggesting isn’t simply a different answer to the question of Little Women’s Feminism, but a different question altogether. It isn’t so much about learning “how to be” through the possibilities granted to the characters in a specific cultural moment, but about learning “how to read”. It is through reading and re-reading that we are able to create “little” paths for ourselves, even in a narrative that doesn’t necessarily grant us a big space to inhabit. 

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Rare Poise

A modern label is draped in the elegance of yesteryear.

Hidden Revelation

Donning robe like fashions of undulating folds and layers, the photos are a study in thoughtful concealment.

Passion Fruit

The consumption of Mediterranean fruit reveals more than meets the eye.

Sand Castles

Oblivious to the power pulsing through their long legs, soft curves, swollen lips, teenagers in the desert tilt their heads toward the sun, until their bodies radiate the heat of the terrain.

Rare Poise

Rare Poise

A modern label is draped in the elegance of yesteryear.

Seamlessly in line with her brand’s ethos, Creative Director and Founder, Maya Reik harnesses a confidence that is profoundly modest. With a sense of purpose that soars beyond trend and into the everlasting, there is a delicateness to her strength, so rare in its nature, it captures a room. 

Beginning by sketching handbags and clothing on a plane ride back from Rome with her father, Reik had been developing the Marei woman for years before actualizing her brand. From the conceptual sketches to the finishing touches, Europe is the main source of inspiration for Marei1998. Travel continues to be a crucial source of influence for the aesthetic of the brand.

For Reik, inspiration always begins with a woman’s essence. The Marei woman embodies an aura of confidence in her femininity. With an affinity for beauty and art, she has a classically elegant mystique about her. Marei1998 takes inspiration from the luxurious golden era of the early 1900’s which had a strong foundation in style. The quality and prestige of the past have  been reimagined to the present day for today’s woman. Marei1998 is distinctly minimalist with a timelessness and a unique ode to the past.

Having received a bevy of celebrity acclaim for her line of faux fur coats in hues of deep chestnut, midnight black, and animal prints, Reik’s affinity for animal rights has been noted. Among the noteworthy are Emma Watson, Ariana Grande, Bella Hadid, and Priyanka Chopra.

To ensure the integrity of the manufacturing of Marei1998 pieces, the team took a trip to Italy to meet the fabric providers who also work with The Row and Gucci. With a staunch devotion to the quality of fabric and precision in the production of the garments, Marei1998 blends elegance and sophistication with a casual and wearable approach to luxury fit for the Marei woman. The world in its most romantic sense is unapologetically definitive of the Marei1998 aesthetic.

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Effortless Wares

Hilla Toledano masters the art of subtlety with her line of leather accessories.

Hidden Revelation

Donning robe like fashions of undulating folds and layers, the photos are a study in thoughtful concealment.

Golden Ratio

A unisex line of handcrafted cuffs are the perfect fit, literally.

Wearable Sculpture

Hed Mayner’s functional wear is sent to space and embodies a utilitarian aesthetic touched by the fine hand of an atelier.

Hidden Revelation

Hidden Revelation

The unwavering gaze consistent throughout the series is a fusion of unapologetic confidence and modesty. Donning robe like fashions of undulating folds and layers, the photos are a study in thoughtful concealment. Jerusalem, one of the oldest cities in the world and holy to the three Abrahamic religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam is comprised of thousands of years of history, with remnants of ancient kingdoms, brutal battles and glorious moments of revelation lying just beneath the street’s surface. From Canaanite, Judean, Assyrian, Babylonian and Persian to Hasmonean, Roman, Byzantine, Muslim, Ottoman, British and Israeli, the city is a portal into an almost infinite number of windows to the past. As an ode to the city’s vast history, the fashion chosen for the shoot is purposefully concealing, hinting that the models, the city, and the region have far more than that which meets the eye. An air of mystery surrounds the models as they float through historic and religious sites. Their clothing, a respectful cloaking, beseeches the viewer to continue looking, learning and uncovering what lies beneath, layer by layer.

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Between Odd & Ordinary

Michal Chelbin questions societal norms and breaks down the definition of what it means to be a child.

Passion Fruit

The consumption of Mediterranean fruit reveals more than meets the eye.

Growing Sideways

What happens if we choose community over continuity, squiggly lines over lineage? What if our friends can teach us more than our public figures? Why not be inspired by what surrounds is instead of what’s “above” us?

Sand Castles

Oblivious to the power pulsing through their long legs, soft curves, swollen lips, teenagers in the desert tilt their heads toward the sun, until their bodies radiate the heat of the terrain.

Between Odd & Ordinary

Between Odd & Ordinary

“I hated every minute of it,” Michal Chelbin confessed, referring to her time working as a news photographer in Israel. “I couldn’t handle photographing people during their most painful moments: grieving, crying in hospital hallways, or anxiously awaiting a courtroom verdict. Eventually, I was fired for always being late.” Chelbin, who has shot campaigns for Gucci and Dior, and has had work featured in some of the world’s most prestigious publications, among them Vogue Italia, The New Yorker, T Magazine, The New York Times Magazine, Time, the Financial Times and GQ. She began photographing when she was 15 years old after joining the photography club in her high school. During her studies at the Wizo Haifa Academy of Design and Education, Chelbin was able to focus on personal projects, something she still spends the majority of her time doing. 

From the very start of her photographic work, Chelbin recalls wanting to direct her own subjects and not shoot from the sidelines, in a more documentary style. She was set on creating her own interpretation of a scene, her own image. Beginning with shooting in 35 mm, Chelbin quickly switched to medium format and portraiture.

Chelbin’s visual language lies within a space the artist likes to call “ between the odd and the ordinary” drawn to the undefinable, the spaces in between, the blurring of identities. Chelbin has found that photographing children and young adults encapsulates this metamorphic position. Vacillating between awareness and naivety, adolescents harness an identity riddled with contradictions. Embodying a sense of innocence they sometimes choose to shed, consciously or otherwise. “Children have the ability to turn innocence on and off, a power not many people in society can tap into.”

Through her choice to photograph children, Chelbin aims to highlight the confusing space when both purity and its opposite, whether it be sin, impurity, or immorality exist together. The moments she captures encapsulate a duality that questions societal norms and breaks down the definition of what it means to be a child, to be untainted by time. Today, time and age are moving at a rapid pace and not necessarily in line with each other. Children are growing up faster than ever before and often times are cast into pre-assigned societal roles, whether it be in accordance with a school, an army, a university, or a family unit. 

The make-up and wardrobe for the shoot were inspired by Japanese Kabuki theatre. Chelbin didn’t want the series to be overpowered by complete costume, so she ‘broke’ the look by not using complete makeup and outfits. “I preferred to create an image without the traditional makeup and mask. It felt more genuine to what the adolescent models represent,” the photographer shared. “I think every human, regardless of their age, wears masks. Children, however, may be less aware of their presence, especially when they are imposed by larger entities. In this series I tried to address more universal themes related to adolescence and masks, like the complexities and multifaceted layers of intention typical of youth, for example,” Chelbin concludes. Often times, children are considered to be the most genuine, unencumbered by guilt, shame, and societal pressure. Free from doubt, insecurity, an awareness of the gaze of others, children whisper to themselves as they build, giggle as they draw, scream when they’re angry, and cry in public when they’re hurt. Chelbin’s series challenges the consciousness that builds with age. The theory that along with maturation, it is necessary to mute the “child-like” openness, the bravery, the voice that at one point, had only one goal, to be heard. 

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Sand Castles

Oblivious to the power pulsing through their long legs, soft curves, swollen lips, teenagers in the desert tilt their heads toward the sun, until their bodies radiate the heat of the terrain.

Model Behavior

Miri Davidovitz uses fashion to shift the conversation surrounding a people.

What Lies Beneath

Fatma Shanan’s large scale oil paintings of traditional rugs depict a connection to customary symbols as well as carving out space for modern dialogue.

Passion Fruit

Passion Fruit

Gauzy garments of a neutral color palette stand in stark contrast with the vivid hues of winter’s fruit. The photo series seeks to highlight the power of femininity and the sensuality ignited by context. Passion Fruit documents the process in which the female interacts with Mediterranean fruit, from silent observer to impassioned consumer, verging on paganistic. By way of consumption, the woman appears to be less concerned with being gazed at, by males or anyone else a gaze, male or otherwise and focuses on her fusion with said fruit. Senesh shares that the all female cast during the production, led to a uniquely feminine and raw approach. The appearance of citrus fruits in the series is an ode to the region and its indigenous bounty. With its deep pigmentation and tendency to stain, the pomegranate is often kept separate from the delicate and refined, whether a human, a tablecloth, or a fine fabric. The series obliterates the normative and depicts a fusion of what does not often mingle.

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Line Dance

Through a reductive approach, Koketit reveals the unseen.

Rare Poise

A modern label is draped in the elegance of yesteryear.

Human Nature

Like the soft petals of a flower tilting towards the sun, unfolding fervently to feel a touch of warmth, Tamar Karavan’s Open Hearts series reveals the innate inclination we have for connection.

What Lies Beneath

Fatma Shanan’s large scale oil paintings of traditional rugs depict a connection to customary symbols as well as carving out space for modern dialogue.

Growing Sideways

Growing Sideways

Top by H&M studio, Pants by Zara

For centuries we’ve imagined our cultural and societal bonds through a father-son dynamic. Our directions of existence, we believed, develop vertically. Knowledge, culture and power are passed down from generation to generation. Progress, change and even time itself march forward and upwards. We dress up, man up, show up and grow up. Laymen look up to gods, children to parents, voters to leaders, followers to celebrities. Rooted in the past, the new generations are put in charge of the future, and on the story goes. Repeat ad infinitum. 

While this dynamic is still dominant, many people experience its vertical logic as reductive, even harmful. Perhaps this is due to the failure of “paternal” institutions, such as the traditional nuclear family, mainstream politics and patriarchal ideologies in making room for various voices and identities. 

Those same voices are now asking: do we continue reproducing vertical histories and legacies or do we try and create new directions of growth? What happens if we choose community over continuity, squiggly lines over lineage, reciprocity over inheritance? What if our friends can teach us more than our public figures? Why not be inspired by what surrounds us instead of what’s “above” us?

Rather than waiting to grow up we might decide to grow sideways. To figure out our own ways to communicate and play while weaving complex networks of brotherhoods, sisterhoods and alternative kinships. In this potential horizontality, in the state of siblingship, the image of the twins is a possible ideal. An equality that isn’t symmetric, a togetherness that allows for singularity, a fluidity of assigned roles. 

Twins, research shows, communicate while still in the womb. At 14 weeks they’re observed purposely reaching out to each other. Their need to connect precedes their own consciousness. It also precedes that iconic gesture of reaching up to a parent figure; a gesture usually thought of as humanity’s earliest and most authentic impulse. That small, in utero and sideways gesture might be a glimmer, a suggestion. What possibilities await if we shift our direction and attention? If we reach out around us, discovering what’s here? If we move and desire horizontally? How would this shift effect the causes we fight for, the art we make, the role-models we choose and the people we become?

Jacket by Zara

Top by Acne for Verner / Jeans by Tommy Hilfiger for Outside Society 

Sweater by H&M /Pants by Tali Kushnir

Coat by Tali Kushnir

Shirt by Cos

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Wearable Sculpture

Hed Mayner’s functional wear is sent to space and embodies a utilitarian aesthetic touched by the fine hand of an atelier.

Model Behavior

Miri Davidovitz uses fashion to shift the conversation surrounding a people.

Ritual Beauty

Maapilim, a Tel Aviv-based brand of bespoke grooming essentials, features a pared-down aesthetic of simple earth-tones that fit seamlessly with the products themselves.

New Necessities

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Wearable Sculpture

Wearable Sculpture

Hed Mayner, 2019 Prix Karl Lagerfeld LVMH Jury Award winner’s functional wear is sent to space and embodies a utilitarian aesthetic touched by the fine hand of an atelier. 

Revealing the strength in fluidity, Hed Mayner’s designs seem to know no bounds. A veil of ambiguity permeates his collections, functional wear is sent to space and embodies a utilitarian aesthetic touched by the fine hand of an atelier, metamorphic in gender and movement. With exaggerated hemlines, asymmetrical coattails, billowing fabric of unexpected layers and a spirit that is as effortless as it is thoughtful, Mayner has carved out a space for his signature motif and is being recognized accordingly. He was selected from a pool of 1,700 applicants as one of the eight finalists of the prestigious 2019 LVMH Prize which will be revealed this June. 

Would you share a bit about where you’re from and your background? 

Hed Mayner: When I was quite young, I met a woman who had a large atelier in the north of Israel near where I lived. The woman had spent time living in Japan and had a home filled with interesting objects and working tools. She was the one who taught me how to cut and sew.

How did your fashion career begin?

HM: During my time at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, I was very drawn to both sculpture and fashion. After I graduated I moved to Paris and studied at the Institut Français de la Mode. When I was ready to start my own brand, I moved back to Tel Aviv. French designer and publisher of Encens magazine, Samuel Drira, helped me develop the image of the brand. With his help, my first collection came out in 2015. It was important to remain independent, especially at this time, so we could naturally find our customer. We sold the collections in Japan and then eventually in the US and Europe. We had the opportunity to have our first show in France when we had finished our first three collections. That was the first time the brand was exposed to the world. Since then, the collections are sold at Dover Street Market and Galeries Lafayette.

What inspires your aesthetic and your work? 

HM: My method is to treat the clothing like it’s a sculpture. I transform classic pieces from the everyday wardrobe and make them more dynamic and alive. I am drawn to fabric that looks familiar at first glance but is actually totally different than what you’d expect. I use cotton and wool but I give the garment different weight so that when you wear it, there is a feeling that is both new and comforting.  

How have your collections evolved over the course of your career? Is there something specific you explore in your designs?

HM: I always explore shape. I’ve always started by scaling up and making the garments “unsized”. I then combine multiple proportions into one garment to create a new silhouette, an evolution of form and movement, if you will.

What would you say is your signature motif and how does that reflect you as a designer?

HM: The jacket we did this winter very much embodies my design aesthetics. The idea is to focus on the body language of the piece when it’s simply hanging. To create shape out of the shapeless, to distort while maintaining a classical element. Heavy cotton, pleats and folding are used to give sculptural effect in the pieces.

What can we expect from your upcoming collection (Spring/Summer 19)?

HM: You’ll find out in June…

You are a finalist for the LVMH prize. Can you speak a bit about this process and what comes next?

HM: I was selected as one of the 20 semifinalists and was afforded the tremendous opportunity to introduce the world to my work in a complete way. I was then chosen as one of the final eight. In June there is another selection and then the nomination for the prize. We are extremely happy to have gotten this far and to get to know the incredible people involved

 

*Article updated September 4th, 2019

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Growing Sideways

What happens if we choose community over continuity, squiggly lines over lineage? What if our friends can teach us more than our public figures? Why not be inspired by what surrounds is instead of what’s “above” us?

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